Common Power Terminology

By January 25, 2023P, T
  • AC power: Alternating current power, which periodically reverses direction.
  • Acoustic Absorption: The reduction of sound energy as it passes through a material or system.
  • Acoustic Echo Cancellation: The process of removing echo from a sound signal.
  • Acoustic Emission: The release of energy in the form of sound waves from a source.
  • Acoustic Impedance: The resistance offered by a material to the passage of sound waves through it.
  • Acoustic Insulation: The use of materials or design to prevent the transmission of sound through a structure.
  • Acoustic Resonance: The phenomenon of increased sound amplitude at certain frequencies in a system or structure.
  • Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI): A system that includes smart meters, communication systems, and software for monitoring and controlling energy consumption at the customer level.
  • Audio Frequency: The range of frequencies audible to the human ear, typically 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz.
  • Base Load: The minimum power demand of an electrical system that must be met at all times.
  • Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV): A vehicle that is powered by electricity stored in a battery, with no internal combustion engine.
  • Battery Energy Storage System (BESS): A system that stores electricity in batteries for later use, used for backup power, load leveling, and peak shaving.
  • Battery Management System (BMS): A system that monitors and manages the performance and safety of the battery in an electric vehicle.
  • Biomass Energy: Energy generated from organic matter such as wood, crops, and waste, typically through the use of combustion or fermentation.
  • Biomass: Organic matter that can be used to generate electricity, such as wood, crops, and waste materials.
  • Blackout: A widespread power outage that affects a large area or region.
  • Brownout: A reduction in voltage in an electrical power supply, resulting in a decrease in the amount of power available.
  • Building Automation System (BAS): A computer-based system that is used to control and monitor various building systems, such as lighting, HVAC, and security.
  • Building Automation System (BAS): A system that controls and monitors the mechanical and electrical systems in a building, such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning.
  • Building Energy Management System (BEMS): A computer-based system that is used to monitor and control the energy consumption of a building.
  • Building Energy Rating (BER): A measure of the energy efficiency of a building, typically expressed as a letter or numeric rating.
  • Building Information Modeling (BIM): A digital representation of a building’s physical and functional characteristics, used for design, construction, and maintenance.
  • Bullet Point List All Hertz Terminology and Related Definitions.
  • Bullet Point List All Power Terminology and Related Definitions.
  • Carbon Cap and Trade: A system in which companies or organizations are given a cap on the amount of greenhouse gases they can emit, and can buy or sell credits to emit more or less.
  • Carbon Credit: A permit that allows a company or organization to emit a certain amount of greenhouse gases.
  • Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (CO2e): A measure of the total greenhouse gas emissions, taking into account the different global warming potentials of different gases.
  • Carbon Footprint: A measure of the total greenhouse gas emissions caused by an individual, organization, or product.
  • Carbon Footprint: The total amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere as a result of human activities, such as energy production and transportation.
  • Carbon Neutral: A term used to describe an energy source or system that does not emit greenhouse gases or results in a net zero emissions of greenhouse gases.
  • Carbon Neutral: Having a net zero carbon footprint, typically achieved by offsetting emissions through carbon credits or other methods.
  • Carbon Offset: A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions that is used to compensate for emissions from another source.
  • Carbon Sequestration: The process of capturing and storing carbon dioxide in order to reduce its impact on the environment.
  • Carbon Tax: A tax imposed on the carbon content of fossil fuels, designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote the use of renewable energy sources.
  • Carbon Tax: A tax on the emission of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide.
  • Circuit breaker: A device that interrupts the flow of electricity in an electrical circuit in case of an overcurrent or short circuit.
  • Clean Energy Standard (CES): A policy that requires a certain percentage of electricity to be generated from clean energy sources.
  • Clean Energy: Energy that has a low environmental impact, typically generated from renewable sources.
  • Climate Change: The long-term changes in temperature, precipitation, wind patterns, and other measures of climate caused by human activity, particularly the burning of fossil fuels.
  • Coefficient of Performance (COP): A measure of the efficiency of a heat pump, typically used for heating systems.
  • Co-generation: A system that generates electricity and useful thermal energy, such as heating and cooling, from the same source.
  • Combined Heat and Power (CHP): A system that generates electricity and captures the waste heat to provide useful thermal energy, such as heating and cooling.
  • Combined Heat and Power (CHP): The simultaneous production of electricity and heat from a single fuel source, such as natural gas or biomass.
  • Compressed Air Energy Storage: A method of energy storage that compresses air during times of low demand and releases it to generate electricity during times of high demand.
  • Concentrated Solar Power (CSP): A technology that uses mirrors to concentrate sunlight to generate electricity.
  • Current: The flow of electric charge, measured in amperes (A).
  • DC power: Direct current power, which flows in one direction.
  • Decentralized Energy: Energy that is generated and distributed on a small scale, typically at or near the point of use.
  • Demand Response: A program that encourages customers to reduce their electricity consumption during peak demand periods, typically through financial incentives.
  • Demand-side Management (DSM): The management of electricity demand through the use of incentives, pricing, and other measures to encourage customers to reduce or shift their energy consumption.
  • Distributed Energy Resource (DER): A source of electrical energy that is located close to the point of consumption, such as rooftop solar panels or small wind turbines.
  • Distributed Generation: The generation of electricity from small-scale and decentralized sources, such as solar panels or small wind turbines, that are located close to the point of use.
  • District Energy: The centralization of energy production and distribution in a specific area, such as a campus or neighborhood.
  • Electric Capacitance: The ability of a material or system to store electric charge, typically measured in farads (F).
  • Electric Conductance: The reciprocal of resistance, typically measured in siemens (S).
  • Electric Current: The flow of electric charge, typically measured in amperes (A).
  • Electric Energy: The total amount of energy transferred or converted, typically measured in watt-hours (Wh) or kilowatt-hours (kWh).
  • Electric Impedance: The combined opposition to the flow of electric current in a circuit, including both resistance and reactance.
  • Electric Inductance: The ability of a material or system to store energy in a magnetic field, typically measured in henries (H).
  • Electric Load: The power consumed by an electrical
  • Electric Power Distribution: The delivery of electrical energy from substations to the customers through a network of power lines and transformers.
  • Electric Power Factor: The ratio of real power to apparent power in an AC circuit.
  • Electric Power Generation: The process of producing electricity, such as by burning fossil fuels, harnessing nuclear reactions, or capturing renewable energy sources.
  • Electric Power Market: A marketplace where buyers and sellers of electricity can trade power at prices determined by supply and demand.
  • Electric Power Planning: The process of forecasting future energy demand and determining the best ways to meet that demand through generation, transmission, and distribution.
  • Electric Power Regulation: The oversight and regulation of the electric power industry by government agencies.
  • Electric Power System Automation: The use of control systems and automation technology to improve the efficiency and reliability of the electric power industry.
  • Electric Power System Communications: The use of communication technology to improve the monitoring, control, and management of the electric power industry.
  • Electric Power System Cybersecurity: The measures taken to protect the electric power industry from cyber threats, such as hacking and malware.
  • Electric Power System Decarbonization: The process of reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power industry, through the use of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency measures.
  • Electric Power System Economics: The study of the economic factors that influence the production, transmission, and consumption of electricity.
  • Electric Power System Maintenance: The regular maintenance and upkeep of the equipment and infrastructure used in the electric power industry.
  • Electric Power System Modernization: The process of upgrading and updating the equipment and infrastructure used in the electric power industry.
  • Electric Power System Protection: The use of devices and systems to prevent damage to equipment and infrastructure in the electric power industry.
  • Electric Power System Reliability: The ability of an electric power system to deliver power to customers as expected, without interruption or failure.
  • Electric Power System Resilience: The ability of an electric power system to withstand and recover from disturbances, such as natural disasters or cyber-attacks.
  • Electric Power System Safety: The measures taken to ensure the safety of people and equipment in the electric power industry.
  • Electric Power System Security: The ability of an electric power system to withstand and recover from intentional or accidental disturbances.
  • Electric Power System Stability: The ability of an electric power system to maintain steady state operation and recover from disturbances.
  • Electric Power System: A network of power plants, transmission lines, substations, and distribution lines that delivers electricity to customers.
  • Electric Power Transmission: The bulk movement of electrical energy from power plants to substations and distribution centers.
  • Electric Power: The rate at which electrical energy is transferred or converted, typically measured in watts (W) or megawatts (MW).
  • Electric Reactance: The opposition to the flow of electric current in an AC circuit caused by the inductance and capacitance of the circuit, typically measured in ohms (Ω).
  • Electric Resistance: The opposition to the flow of electric current, typically measured in ohms (Ω).
  • Electric Vehicle (EV): A vehicle that is powered by an electric motor, using energy stored in batteries.
  • Electric Vehicle (EV): A vehicle that is powered by electricity, typically through a battery or fuel cell.
  • Electric Vehicle Charging Station: A facility that provides charging equipment for electric vehicles, including level 1, level 2, and level 3 charging.
  • Electric Voltage: The potential difference in electric potential between two points, typically measured in volts (V).
  • Electromagnetic Spectrum: The range of all types of electromagnetic radiation, including radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays.
  • Energy Access: The availability and affordability of energy services to meet the basic needs of individuals and communities.
  • Energy Analytics: The use of data and statistical techniques to analyze energy consumption patterns and identify opportunities for energy savings.
  • Energy Audit: A comprehensive analysis of the energy consumption and efficiency of a building or facility, with the goal of identifying opportunities for energy savings.
  • Energy Audit: A detailed examination of energy use in a building or facility, including a review of equipment and systems, and the identification of energy savings opportunities.
  • Energy Auditing: The process of evaluating energy consumption and identifying opportunities for energy efficiency and conservation in a building or facility.
  • Energy Auditing: The process of identifying and measuring the energy consumption of a facility or system, in order to identify opportunities for energy savings.
  • Energy Benchmarking: The process of comparing the energy performance of a building or facility to similar buildings or industry standards.
  • Energy Blockchain: A decentralized system for managing energy transactions and trading, using blockchain technology.
  • Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC): A set of guidelines for energy efficient design and construction of buildings in India, developed by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) under the Ministry of Power.
  • Energy Conservation Code (ECC): A set of building codes that promote energy efficiency in new construction and major renovations.
  • Energy Conservation Measure (ECM): A strategy or technology that is used to reduce energy consumption, such as installing energy-efficient lighting or upgrading HVAC systems.
  • Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs): Specific actions or technologies implemented to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption.
  • Energy Conservation: The practice of reducing energy consumption through changes in behavior, such as turning off lights when leaving a room or using energy-efficient appliances.
  • Energy Conservation: the reduction of energy consumption by using energy more efficiently
  • Energy Conservation: The reduction of energy consumption by using energy more efficiently or by reducing the amount of energy used for a given task.
  • Energy Dashboard: A software application that displays energy consumption data in real-time, allowing for easy monitoring and analysis of energy usage.
  • Energy Density: The amount of energy stored per unit volume, typically measured in watt-hours per liter (Wh/L) or joules per cubic meter (J/m³).
  • Energy Diversification: The use of multiple energy sources to reduce dependence on a single source and reduce risk.
  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE): A program in the United States, run by the Department of Energy, that supports research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.
  • Energy Efficiency Financing: The use of financial instruments such as loans, grants, and bonds to fund energy efficiency projects.
  • Energy Efficiency Rating: A measure of the energy efficiency of a building, appliance, or product, such as the Energy Star rating in the United States.
  • Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER): A measure of the efficiency of air conditioning equipment, typically used for cooling systems.
  • Energy Efficiency Retrofit: The process of upgrading or retrofitting a building or facility to improve energy efficiency, such as by installing energy-efficient lighting or HVAC systems.
  • Energy Efficiency Services Limited (EESL): A joint venture company of state-owned companies under the Ministry of Power, Government of India, that provides energy efficiency solutions across various sectors.
  • Energy Efficiency Standards: Regulations or guidelines that set minimum energy performance standards for buildings, appliances, and products.
  • Energy Efficiency: The use of less energy to perform the same task, usually achieved through the use of more efficient technologies or changes in behavior.
  • Energy Efficiency: The use of technology, design, and practices to reduce the amount of energy required to perform a specific task or function.
  • Energy Harvesting: The process of capturing and converting energy from natural sources such as sunlight, wind, and vibrations into usable electrical energy.
  • Energy Harvesting: The process of collecting energy from the environment and converting it into usable forms of energy, such as electricity.
  • Energy independence: The ability of a country or region to meet its own energy needs without relying on imported energy.
  • Energy Independence: The ability of a country or region to produce enough energy to meet its own needs without relying on imports.
  • Energy Information System (EIS): A system that collects, stores, and analyzes energy data for monitoring and reporting purposes.
  • Energy Intelligence: The use of data and analytics to improve the understanding of energy consumption patterns and identify opportunities for energy savings.
  • Energy Internet: A concept of creating a global energy network that interconnects energy sources, storage systems, and loads, enabling the efficient and sustainable exchange of energy.
  • Energy Labelling: A system of providing information to consumers about the energy efficiency of products, typically through the use of labels or ratings.
  • Energy Management and Control System (EMCS): A computer-based system that is used to monitor and control the energy consumption of a building or facility.
  • Energy Management and Control System (EMCS): A system that monitors and controls the energy consumption of a building, typically through the use of sensors and actuators.
  • Energy Management as a Service (EMaaS): A service offered by a third-party company that provides energy management solutions to customers, typically through the use of advanced technology and data analytics.
  • Energy Management Certification: A certification program, such as the Certified Energy Manager (CEM) or the Building Energy Management Professional (BEMP) that recognizes individuals who have demonstrated knowledge and skills in energy management.
  • Energy Management Control System (EMCS): A computer-based system that is used to monitor and control the energy consumption of a building or facility.
  • Energy Management Information System (EMIS): A computer-based system that is used to collect, store, and analyze energy consumption data.
  • Energy Management Plan (EMP): A comprehensive plan that outlines the strategies, actions, and goals to be taken to improve energy efficiency, reduce energy consumption and costs, and achieve energy-related targets.
  • Energy Management Plan (EMP): A plan that outlines the strategies and actions that will be taken to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy costs.
  • Energy Management Plan: A plan that outlines the strategies and actions to be taken to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption.
  • Energy Management Services: A service offered by a third-party company that provides energy management solutions to customers, typically through the use of advanced technology and data analytics.
  • Energy Management Software (EMS): A software application that helps to monitor, analyze, and control energy consumption, costs, and emissions in real-time.
  • Energy Management Software: A computer program that is used to monitor and control energy consumption in a facility or system.
  • Energy Management Software: A software application that helps to monitor and manage energy consumption and costs.
  • Energy Management Standards: Standards and guidelines for energy management systems, such as ISO 50001 for energy management systems, developed by international organizations like International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Audit: A review and evaluation of an existing Energy Management System to ensure compliance with standards, identify potential areas for improvement, and assess the system’s effectiveness.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Automation: The use of technology to automate various tasks and functions within an Energy Management System, such as data collection and analysis, alerts and notifications, and energy usage scheduling.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Carbon Emissions Management: The process of tracking, managing, and reducing carbon emissions from energy consumption.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Carbon Footprint: The total amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere as a result of energy consumption by an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Certification: A certification program that verifies that an organization’s Energy Management System meets the standard requirements.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Cloud-based: A type of Energy Management System that is hosted on a remote server and accessible via the internet, allowing for easy access and remote management.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Compliance: The ability of an Energy Management System to meet legal and regulatory requirements for energy management, such as those set by the ISO 50001 standard.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Customization: The ability to adjust and configure an Energy Management System to meet the specific needs of an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Data Analysis: The process of analyzing data collected by an Energy Management System to identify patterns, trends, and opportunities for energy savings.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Data Export: The ability to export data collected by an Energy Management System to external software or platforms for further analysis.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Data Visualization: The use of charts, graphs, and other visual aids to display data collected by an Energy Management System in a clear and easy-to-understand format.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Accounting: The process of tracking and accounting for energy usage and costs within an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Auditing: The process of evaluating energy consumption and identifying opportunities for energy efficiency and conservation in a building or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Budgeting: The process of creating and managing an energy budget for an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Conservation: The process of reducing energy consumption through the use of energy-efficient technologies, equipment, and practices.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Efficiency: The ratio of useful energy output to energy input, or the ability of a system to perform its intended function with a minimal amount of energy.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Forecasting: The use of historical data and energy usage patterns to predict future energy consumption and costs.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management Metrics: A set of measurements and indicators used to evaluate the performance and efficiency of an organization or facility’s energy management system.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management Plan (EMP): A comprehensive plan that outlines the strategies, actions, and goals to be taken to improve energy efficiency, reduce energy consumption and costs, and achieve energy-related targets.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management Policy: A statement outlining an organization or facility’s commitment to energy management and energy efficiency.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management Program (EMP): A set of actions, procedures, and policies put in place to manage and improve the energy performance of an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Conservation Plan (ECP): A plan outlining the strategies, actions, and goals to be taken to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption in a building or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER): A measure of the cooling efficiency of air conditioners and heat pumps.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Factor (EF): A measure of the energy efficiency of appliances such as water heaters, clothes washers and dryers.
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  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Star: A certification program that recognizes and promotes energy-efficient products and buildings.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Integration: The process of connecting different energy management systems and devices to work together to improve energy efficiency and reduce consumption.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Return on Investment (ROI): The ratio of the benefits gained from an Energy Management System to the costs incurred in implementing it.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management System (EMS) Sustainability: The ability of an Energy Management System to support long-term environmental and social sustainability goals.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Management Systems (EMSs) Standards: Standards and guidelines for energy management systems, such as ISO 50001 for energy management systems, developed by international organizations like International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Optimization: The process of identifying and implementing measures to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Performance Contracting (EPC): A type of contract where an Energy Service Company (ESCO) provides energy efficiency improvements in a facility, and the savings from these improvements are used to pay for the work over a specified period of time.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Performance Indicator (EnPI): A metric used to measure and evaluate the energy performance of a building or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Procurement: The process of acquiring energy, typically electricity or natural gas, for a building or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Reduction: The process of reducing the overall energy consumption of an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Savings Opportunities (ESOs): Areas or processes within an organization or facility where energy savings can be achieved through the implementation of energy efficiency measures and conservation practices.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Savings Verification: The process of measuring and verifying the energy savings achieved through the implementation of energy efficiency measures and conservation practices.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Energy Savings: The reduction in energy consumption achieved through energy efficiency measures and conservation practices.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Implementation: The process of installing and configuring an Energy Management System in an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Integration: The process of connecting different energy management systems and devices to work together to improve energy efficiency and reduce consumption.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Maintenance: The ongoing care and upkeep of an Energy Management System to ensure it continues to function properly and provide accurate data.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Notification and Alerts: The ability to set up notifications and alerts within an Energy Management System to notify users of energy usage patterns, energy cost, and other energy-related information.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Performance Monitoring: The process of regularly monitoring the performance of an Energy Management System to ensure it is functioning properly and providing accurate data.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Remote Access: The ability to access and control an Energy Management System remotely through a web-based interface or mobile device.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Renewable Energy Integration: The process of integrating renewable energy sources, such as solar or wind, into an Energy Management System to increase the use of sustainable energy.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Reporting: The process of generating and sharing reports on energy consumption, costs, and emissions, often in a visual format, such as graphs and charts.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Scalability: The ability of an Energy Management System to adapt and accommodate the changing energy needs of an organization or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Security: The measures taken to protect an Energy Management System from unauthorized access, tampering, or cyber-attacks.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Software: A software application used to monitor, analyze, and control energy consumption, costs, and emissions in real-time.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Training: Training provided to employees on the proper use and maintenance of an Energy Management System.
  • Energy Management System (EMS) Upgrade: The process of updating an existing Energy Management System with new software, hardware, or features to improve its performance and capabilities.
  • Energy Management System (EMS): A system that monitors and controls the energy consumption of a facility or system, in order to optimize energy efficiency and reduce costs.
  • Energy Management System (EMS): A system that monitors and controls the generation, distribution, and consumption of energy in a building or facility.
  • Energy Management System (EMS): A system that monitors, controls and optimizes the energy consumption of a facility or building.
  • Energy Management System (EMS): A system that monitors, controls, and optimizes the energy consumption of a facility or building, including lighting, HVAC, and other systems.
  • Energy Management System (ISO 50001): An international standard for energy management systems, developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), that provides a framework for improving energy efficiency and reducing energy consumption.
  • Energy Management System certification: A certification program that verifies the energy management system of an organization or facility meets the standard requirements.
  • Energy Management Systems Integration: A process that connects different energy management systems and devices to work together to improve energy efficiency and reduce consumption.
  • Energy Management Systems Integration: The process of connecting and coordinating various energy management systems, such as building automation systems and energy management software, to improve overall energy efficiency.
  • Energy Management: The process of monitoring, controlling, and optimizing the energy consumption of a facility or system.
  • Energy Mix: The combination of different energy sources used to meet energy demand.
  • Energy Modeling: The use of computer simulations to predict the energy consumption and performance of a building or facility.
  • Energy Optimization: The process of identifying and implementing changes to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy costs.
  • Energy Performance Contracting (EPC): A type of contract in which an energy services company (ESCO) guarantees energy savings through the implementation of energy efficiency measures, and is paid based on the achieved savings.
  • Energy Performance Contracting (EPC): A type of contract where an ESCO provides energy efficiency improvements in a facility, and the savings from these improvements are used to pay for the work over a specified period of time.
  • Energy Poverty: The lack of access to affordable and reliable energy services.
  • Energy Procurement Plan (EPP): A plan that outlines the strategies, actions, and goals to be taken to acquire energy, typically electricity or natural gas, for a building or facility in a cost-effective and sustainable manner.
  • Energy Procurement: The process of acquiring energy, such as electricity or natural gas, through contracts or agreements with suppliers.
  • Energy Procurement: The process of acquiring energy, typically electricity or natural gas, for a building or facility.
  • Energy Rating Label: A label that provides information on the energy efficiency of a product, such as the EnergyGuide label in the United States.
  • Energy Rating: A numerical score assigned to a building or facility that represents its energy efficiency and performance.
  • Energy Recovery Ventilation (ERV): A type of ventilation system that captures energy from exhausted air to preheat or precool incoming air.
  • Energy Resilience: The ability of an energy system to withstand and quickly recover from disruptions, such as natural disasters or cyberattacks.
  • Energy Retrofit: The process of upgrading or retrofitting a building or facility to improve energy efficiency.
  • Energy Retrofitting: The process of upgrading the energy efficiency of an existing building or facility through the installation of new technologies or equipment.
  • Energy Return on Investment (EROI): A measure of the energy efficiency of a particular energy source, calculated as the ratio of the energy produced to the energy consumed.
  • Energy Saving: the reduction of energy consumption by using less energy to accomplish the same task
  • Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC): A contract where an Energy Service Company (ESCO) provides energy efficiency improvements in a facility, and the savings from these improvements are used to pay for the work over a specified period of time.
  • Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC): A type of contract in which an energy services company (ESCO) guarantees energy savings through the implementation of energy efficiency measures, and is paid based on the achieved savings.
  • Energy Security: The ability of a society to ensure the availability and accessibility of energy at all times and to protect itself against disruptions in the energy supply.
  • Energy Security: The ability to ensure a reliable and stable supply of energy to meet the needs of a country or region.
  • Energy Service Agreement (ESA): A contract between a facility owner and an energy service provider that outlines the services to be provided, such as energy efficiency retrofits, and the terms of payment.
  • Energy Service Agreement (ESA): A type of contract in which an energy services company (ESCO) guarantees energy savings through the implementation of energy efficiency measures, and is paid based on the achieved savings.
  • Energy Service Company (ESCO): A company that provides energy-related services such as energy audits, retrofits, and performance contracting.
  • Energy Service Company (ESCO): A company that provides energy-related services such as energy efficiency audits, retrofits, and performance contracting.
  • Energy Service Company (ESCO): A company that specializes in providing energy-related services, such as energy audits, retrofits, and energy management systems.
  • Energy Services Agreement (ESA): A contract between a facility owner and an energy service provider that outlines the services to be provided, such as energy efficiency retrofits, and the terms of payment.
  • Energy Services Company (ESCO): A company that specializes in providing energy-related services, such as energy audits, retrofits, and energy management systems.
  • Energy Simulation: A computer-based tool that allows to simulate the energy performance of a building, equipment or process to identify energy savings opportunities and evaluate the performance of different design options.
  • Energy Star Portfolio Manager: A web-based tool in the United States, run by the Environmental Protection Agency, that allows users to track and benchmark energy consumption in buildings.
  • Energy Star: A program in the United States, run by the Environmental Protection Agency, that certifies buildings and products that meet energy efficiency standards.
  • Energy Star: A program run by the US Environmental Protection Agency that certifies buildings and products that meet certain energy efficiency standards.
  • Energy Storage System (ESS): A system that stores energy for later use, such as batteries, flywheels, or pumped hydroelectric storage.
  • Energy Storage System (ESS): A system that stores energy for later use, such as in batteries or flywheels.
  • Energy Storage: The process of storing energy for later use, such as in batteries or flywheels.
  • Energy Storage: The storage of energy for later use, such as in batteries or flywheels.
  • Energy Transition: The process of moving from an energy system based on fossil fuels to one based on renewable energy sources and energy efficiency.
  • Energy Transition: The process of moving from traditional energy sources to renewable energy sources.
  • Energy: The ability to do work, typically measured in joules (J) or watt-hours (Wh).
  • Energy-Efficient Appliances: Appliances that consume less energy than traditional appliances.
  • Energy-Efficient Buildings Hub (EEB Hub): A program in the United States, run by the Department of Energy, that supports research and development of energy-efficient building technologies.
  • Energy-Efficient Communities Program (EECP): A program in the United States, run by the Department of Energy, that provides funding and technical assistance to communities for energy efficiency projects.
  • Energy-Efficient Lighting: The use of lighting technologies that consume less energy than traditional incandescent bulbs.
  • Energy-Efficient Mortgages (EEM): A type of mortgage that allows homeowners to finance energy-efficient improvements to their homes.
  • Feed-in Tariff (FIT): A policy mechanism that guarantees a fixed price for renewable energy generated by small-scale producers, such as households and small businesses.
  • Feed-in Tariff (FIT): A policy that guarantees a fixed price for electricity generated from renewable energy sources.
  • Forced Vibration: The vibration of a system or structure caused by an external force.
  • Frequency: The number of oscillations or cycles of a wave in a given period of time, measured in hertz (Hz).
  • Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV): A vehicle that generates electricity through a chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen, typically in a fuel cell.
  • Fuel Cell: A device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy through a process known as electrolysis.
  • Gamma rays: Electromagnetic waves that have the shortest wavelength and highest frequency in the electromagnetic spectrum and are used for medical imaging and cancer treatment.
  • Generation Capacity: The maximum power that can be generated by a power plant or system.
  • Generator: A device that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.
  • Geothermal Energy: Energy generated from the heat of the earth, typically through the use of geothermal heat pumps or geothermal power plants.
  • Geothermal: The use of heat from the Earth’s crust to generate electricity.
  • Green Building: A building that is designed, constructed, and operated to minimize its environmental impact and promote sustainability.
  • Green Energy: Energy that is generated from renewable sources and has a low environmental impact.
  • Green Lease: A lease agreement that includes provisions for energy efficiency and sustainability, such as energy efficient equipment and building systems, recycling and composting programs, and green transportation options.
  • Green Power: Electricity that is generated from renewable energy sources.
  • Greenhouse Gas: A gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect, such as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and others.
  • Grid-Connected: A system that is connected to the electrical grid and can draw power from it as well as feed power back to it.
  • Grid-Tie: A system that is connected to the electrical grid and can draw power from it as well as feed power back to it.
  • Grid-tied System: A system that is connected to the electrical grid and can feed excess power back into the grid.
  • Ground: A reference point in an electrical circuit, often connected to the Earth.
  • Harmonic Frequencies: Frequencies that are integral multiples of the fundamental frequency.
  • Harmonics: Distortion of an electrical waveform caused by non-linear loads, such as electronic devices.
  • Harmonics: Distortions in the waveform of an AC voltage or current caused by non-linear loads, such as electronic devices.
  • Hertz (Hz): The unit of frequency, defined as the number of cycles per second.
  • Home Automation: The use of technology to automate various tasks and functions in a home, such as lighting, heating, and security.
  • Home Energy Management System (HEMS): A system that monitors and controls the energy consumption of a home, typically through the use of smart devices and appliances.
  • Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV): A vehicle that has a combination of an electric motor and an internal combustion engine, which work together to improve fuel efficiency.
  • Hydroelectric Energy: Energy generated from the movement of water, typically through the use of dams or water turbines.
  • Hydroelectric: The use of falling water to generate electricity.
  • Impedance: The measure of the opposition to current flow in an AC circuit, including both resistance and reactance.
  • Infrared: Electromagnetic waves that have a shorter wavelength and higher frequency than microwaves and are used for heating and sensing temperature.
  • Infrasound: Sound waves with frequencies lower than the lower limit of human hearing (20 Hz).
  • Internet of Things (IoT): A network of internet-connected devices that can collect and exchange data.
  • Inverter: A device that converts DC power into AC power.
  • Kilowatt-hours (kWh): A unit of energy, equal to one thousand watt-hours.
  • Level 1 Charging: Charging an electric vehicle using a standard 120-volt household outlet, typically providing a charge rate of 2 to 5 miles of range per hour of charging.
  • Level 2 Charging: Charging an electric vehicle using a 240-volt charger, typically providing a charge rate of 10 to 25 miles of range per hour of charging.
  • Level 3 Charging: Charging an electric vehicle using a high-power DC fast charger, typically providing a charge rate of 50 to 100 miles of range per hour of charging.
  • Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): A measure of the cost of electricity generation from a particular energy source, taking into account the costs of construction, operation, and decommissioning.
  • Load Factor: The ratio of the average load to the peak load, used to measure the utilization of electrical generation and transmission capacity.
  • Load Factor: The ratio of the average power consumption to the peak power consumption of a load.
  • Load: An electrical device or system that consumes power.
  • Microgeneration: The small-scale production of electricity, typically by individuals or small businesses, through technologies such as solar panels or small wind turbines.
  • Microgrid: A small-scale electrical grid that can operate independently or in conjunction with the larger grid.
  • Microgrid: A small-scale power grid that can operate independently or connected to the larger power grid, typically used for remote or off-grid locations.
  • Microgrid: A small-scale power grid that is connected to the larger power grid, but can also operate independently.
  • Microturbine: A small-scale turbine that generates electricity through the combustion of natural gas or other fuels.
  • Microwaves: Electromagnetic waves that have a shorter wavelength and higher frequency than radio waves.
  • Natural Frequency: The frequency at which a system or structure will vibrate when excited.
  • Net Metering: A policy that allows customers to generate electricity from renewable energy sources and sell any excess back to the grid.
  • Net metering: A system that allows homeowners with solar panels or other renewable energy sources to send excess power back to the grid and receive credits on their utility bills.
  • Net Zero Energy: A building or facility that produces as much energy as it consumes on an annual basis.
  • Net-metering: A billing arrangement where excess electricity generated by a renewable energy system is fed back to the grid, and the customer is credited for the excess generation.
  • Net-zero Energy Building: A building that generates as much energy as it consumes, typically through the use of renewable energy sources such as solar or wind.
  • Non-renewable Energy: Energy generated from sources that are finite and will eventually be depleted, such as fossil fuels.
  • Non-Renewable Energy: Energy sources that are finite, such as fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) and nuclear energy.
  • Off-grid system: A system that is not connected to the electrical grid and relies on batteries or generators to store and supply power.
  • Off-Grid: A system that is not connected to the electrical grid and relies on its own power generation.
  • Overcurrent: A current flow in an electrical circuit that exceeds the rated current.
  • Passive House: A building that is designed to minimize energy consumption through the use of passive solar design, high insulation, and airtight construction.
  • Passive House: A building that requires very little energy for heating and cooling, achieved through the use of advanced insulation and airtight construction.
  • Peak Load: The highest level of power consumption in a given period of time.
  • Peak Load: The maximum power demand of an electrical system during a specified period of time.
  • Photovoltaic (PV) Cells: Devices that convert sunlight into electricity through the photovoltaic effect.
  • Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV): A vehicle that can be charged from an external power source and has a combination of an electric motor and an internal combustion engine.
  • Power Density: The rate of energy production per unit area, typically measured in watts per square meter (W/m²).
  • Power Factor Correction: The technique of adjusting the phase angle between current and voltage to improve the power factor of an AC circuit.
  • Power factor: The ratio of real power to apparent power in an AC circuit.
  • Power Factor: The ratio of the real power used in an electrical system to the apparent power, which is the vector sum of the real and reactive power.
  • Power Flow: The movement of electric power through a transmission or distribution system.
  • Power Grid: The interconnected system of power generation, transmission, and distribution that supplies electricity to an area or region.
  • Power Loss: The amount of power that is lost as it is transmitted through a system, due to resistance, reactance, and other factors.
  • Power Loss: The amount of power that is not delivered to the intended load or consumer, due to inefficiencies or resistive losses in the electrical system.
  • Power Outage: An interruption in the electric power supply.
  • Power Purchase Agreement (PPA): An agreement between a power generator and a power purchaser, where the generator agrees to sell a certain amount of electricity at a fixed price over a specified period of time.
  • Power Quality Analyzer: A device that is used to measure and analyze the voltage, current, and frequency characteristics of an electrical power supply.
  • Power Quality Monitoring: The process of measuring and analyzing the voltage, current, and frequency characteristics of an electrical power supply.
  • Power Quality: Describes the voltage, current, and frequency characteristics of an electrical power supply.
  • Power Quality: The measure of the electrical characteristics of a power system, including voltage, current, and frequency.
  • Power Terminology Definitions
  • Power: The rate at which energy is transferred or converted, typically measured in watts (W) or megawatts (MW).
  • Power: The rate at which energy is transferred or work is done, typically measured in watts (W) or horsepower (hp).
  • Power-to-X: A technology that converts surplus renewable energy into a storable form, such as hydrogen or synthetic fuels.
  • Pumped Hydroelectric Storage: A method of energy storage that pumps water to a higher elevation when there is excess energy, and releases the water to generate electricity when there is a demand.
  • Radio Waves: Electromagnetic waves that have the longest wavelength and lowest frequency in the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Range Extender: A device that increases the range of an electric vehicle by generating electricity to supplement the power from the battery.
  • Reactance: The measure of the opposition to current flow in an AC circuit due to the presence of inductors and capacitors, measured in ohms (Ω).
  • Renewable Energy Certificate (REC): A certificate that represents the environmental benefits of generating electricity from renewable energy sources.
  • Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs): A certificate that represents the environmental benefits of generating electricity from renewable energy sources.
  • Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs): Certificates that represent the environmental attributes of renewable energy, such as the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Renewable Energy Credits (RECs): A certificate that represents the environmental benefits of generating electricity from renewable energy sources.
  • Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS): A policy that requires a certain percentage of electricity to be generated from renewable energy sources.
  • Renewable Energy: Energy generated from natural, replenishable sources, such as sunlight, wind, water, and geothermal heat.
  • Renewable Energy: Energy sources that are replenished naturally, such as solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, and biomass.
  • Renewable Energy: Energy that is generated from natural resources that are replenished naturally, such as solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, and biomass.
  • Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS): A policy that requires a certain percentage of electricity to be generated from renewable energy sources.
  • Resistance: The measure of how difficult it is for current to flow through a material, measured in ohms (Ω).
  • Resonance: The condition where the natural frequency of a system or structure coincides with the frequency of an applied force.
  • Short circuit: An accidental path of low resistance between two points in an electrical circuit, causing an excessive current flow.
  • Smart Building: A building that uses advanced technologies, such as sensors, communication networks, and control systems, to improve energy efficiency, comfort, and safety.
  • Smart Grid: A power grid that is equipped with advanced technology for monitoring and controlling the flow of electricity, including the integration of renewable energy sources and distributed generation.
  • Smart Grid: An advanced power grid that uses digital technology to monitor and control the flow of electricity, allowing for the integration of renewable energy sources and demand-side management.
  • Smart Grid: An electrical grid that uses advanced technologies such as sensors, communication networks, and advanced control systems to improve the efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of the power supply.
  • Smart Home: A home that is equipped with technology for monitoring and controlling the various systems, such as lighting, heating, and appliances, from a central hub or through a mobile device.
  • Smart Meter: An electronic device that records the consumption of electricity, gas, or water at regular intervals and sends the data to the utility company.
  • Smart Meter: An electronic meter that records electricity consumption in intervals of an hour or less and communicates the information back to the utility company.
  • Solar Energy: Energy generated from the sun, typically through the use of photovoltaic cells or concentrated solar power systems.
  • Solar: The use of energy from the sun to generate electricity.
  • Sound Frequency: The number of oscillations or cycles of a sound wave in a given period of time, measured in hertz (Hz).
  • Spinning Reserve: The additional generating capacity that is kept running and synchronized to the power grid in case of unexpected demand.
  • Subharmonics: Frequencies that are sub-multiples of the fundamental frequency.
  • Surge protection: A device that protects electrical equipment from voltage spikes caused by lightning strikes or power outages.
  • Thermal Energy Storage: A method of energy storage that stores heat during times of low demand and releases it to generate electricity during times of high demand.
  • Tidal Energy: Energy generated from the movement of ocean tides, typically through the use of tidal turbines.
  • Transactive Energy: A system that uses market mechanisms and digital technology to manage the balance between energy supply and demand in real-time.
  • Transactive Energy: An energy management system that uses market mechanisms, such as pricing and incentives, to balance the supply and demand of electricity.
  • Transformer: A device that changes the voltage level of an AC power source.
  • Transmission Capacity: The maximum power that can be transmitted by a transmission line or system.
  • Ultrasound: Sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper limit of human hearing (20,000 Hz).
  • Ultraviolet: Electromagnetic waves that have a shorter wavelength and higher frequency than visible light and are used for tanning and disinfection.
  • Virtual Power Plant (VPP): A system that aggregates the output of distributed energy resources, such as solar panels and electric vehicles, and manages it as a single entity.
  • Visible Light: Electromagnetic waves that have a shorter wavelength and higher frequency than infrared and are visible to the human eye.
  • Voltage: The electric potential difference between two points, measured in volts (V).
  • Watt-hours (Wh): A unit of energy, equal to one watt of power used for one hour.
  • Wave Energy: Energy generated from the movement of ocean waves, typically through the use of wave energy converters.
  • Wavelength: The distance between two consecutive points of a wave that are in phase.
  • Wind Energy: Energy generated from the wind, typically through the use of wind turbines.
  • Wind Turbine: A machine that converts the kinetic energy of the wind into electricity.
  • Wind: The use of energy from the wind to generate electricity.
  • X-rays: Electromagnetic waves that have a shorter wavelength and higher frequency than ultraviolet and are used for medical imaging and cancer treatment.
  • Zero-Energy Building (ZEB): A building that produces as much energy as it consumes on an annual basis, typically through the use of renewable energy sources.

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