Common Line Terminology

By January 25, 2023L, T
  • Baseline: A line used as a reference point or starting point for measurements or observations.
  • Break Line: A line used to indicate a change in elevation or other feature on a map or chart.
  • Bresenham’s Line Algorithm: An algorithm for drawing lines on a raster display or grid, developed by Jack Bresenham.
  • Bullet Point List All Line Terminology and Related Definitions.
  • Contour Line: A line on a map or chart connects points of equal elevation.
  • DDA Line Algorithm: An algorithm for drawing lines on a raster display or grid based on floating-point arithmetic.
  • Flow Line: A line representing a fluid or gas flow.
  • Infinite Line: A line that extends indefinitely in both directions.
  • Intersection of Lines: The point or points at which two or more lines meet.
  • Isocline: A line on a map or chart that connects points of equal value or concentration of a specific variable such as temperature, precipitation, or elevation.
  • Lead Line: A line used to determine water depth, usually marked in fathoms or meters.
  • Line of Action: The direction in which an object moves or the path it follows.
  • Line of Action: The line that connects the point of force application and the point of load application.
  • Line of Advance: The direction or route a military force is moving towards.
  • Line of Argument: A series of statements or reasoning used to support a particular position or viewpoint.
  • Line of Attack: A military force’s direction or route to advance or attack an enemy.
  • Line of Authority: The chain of command within an organization or group, indicating who is responsible for making decisions and giving orders.
  • Line of Bearings: A line connecting two points on a map or chart and showing the direction of one point relative to the other.
  • Line of Best Fit: A line that is drawn through a set of data points in such a way that it minimizes the sum of the distances between the data points and the line.
  • Line of Business (LOB): A specific area or aspect of a company’s operations, such as finance, marketing, or sales.
  • Line of Business: A specific area or aspect of a company’s operations, such as finance, marketing, or sales.
  • Line of Code (LOC): A measure of the size of a computer program equal to the number of lines in the text of the program’s source code.
  • Line of Communication: The route or means by which a military force receives supplies, reinforcements, or information.
  • Line of Contact: The point or area where opposing forces meet or engage in combat.
  • Line of Control: A boundary that separates areas of control or influence between opposing military forces or political entities.
  • Line of Credit: A financial agreement in which a lender agrees to extend a certain amount of credit to a borrower for a certain period of time.
  • Line of Credit: An agreement by a financial institution to extend credit up to a certain limit for a certain period of time.
  • Line of Defense: The military or strategic positions or resources that are used to protect against an enemy or potential threat.
  • Line of Demarcation: A boundary that separates two different areas or regions.
  • Line of Departure: The point or line where a military force begins its advance or attack.
  • Line of Duty: A term used to describe the specific duties or responsibilities of an individual or organization.
  • Line of Enquiry: A line of investigation or inquiry into a particular topic or issue.
  • Line of Evidence: A collection of facts, data, or other information used to support a particular claim or conclusion.
  • Line of Fire: The area or direction in which an enemy or potential threat is positioned.
  • Line of Force: A line that represents the direction and intensity of a force or field.
  • Line of Inquiry: A method of investigation in which a researcher poses a question and uses various sources to gather information in order to answer it.
  • Line of Interview: A method of research in which the researcher conducts a face-to-face or telephone conversation with a participant or subject.
  • Line of Latitude: A line on the Earth’s surface that runs parallel to the equator, also known as a parallel.
  • Line of Longitude: A line on the Earth’s surface that runs from the North Pole to the South Pole, also known as a meridian.
  • Line of Position (LOP): A line on a navigation chart that represents the location of a vessel or aircraft.
  • Line of Product: A range of related products or services offered by a company.
  • Line of Questioning: A series of questions asked by an interviewer or investigator to gather information or elicit a response.
  • Line of Reflection: A line in which a shape is reflected over.
  • Line of Regression: A line that represents the average relationship between two variables in a set of data.
  • Line of Retreat: The direction or route that a military force uses to withdraw or retreat.
  • Line of Rotation: A line around which a shape is rotated.
  • Line of Scrimmage: The line on a football field where the ball is placed at the beginning of each play.
  • Line of Service: A specific area of expertise or service offered by a company or organization.
  • Line of Sight Navigation: A navigation method that involves using the position of known landmarks or features to determine one’s current location.
  • Line of Sight: A line that represents the direction in which an observer is looking or the direction in which a signal or wave is traveling.
  • Line of Sight: The straight path that light takes between an observer and a point of interest.
  • Line of Supply: The route or means by which a military force receives supplies and provisions.
  • Line of Symmetry: A line that divides a shape into two parts that are mirror images of each other.
  • Line of Translation: A line along which a shape is moved.
  • Line of Work: An individual’s occupation or profession.
  • Line Segment: A part of a line that connects two specific points.
  • Line T&D: Terminology Definitions
  • Line: A continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point or edge.
  • Median Line: A line that separates a set of data into two equal parts, with half of the data points above the line and half below it.
  • Midpoint Line Algorithm: An algorithm for drawing lines on a raster display or grid, based on the use of the midpoint of a line segment.
  • Normal Form of a Line: A mathematical representation of a line in the form of an equation, where a point defines the line on it and the normal vector of the line.
  • Parallel Lines: Two lines that are always the same distance apart and never meet.
  • Parametric Form of a Line: A mathematical representation of a line in the form of an equation, where a point defines the line on it and a direction vector.
  • Perpendicular Lines: Two lines that intersect at a right angle.
  • Point-slope Form of a Line: A mathematical representation of a line in the form of an equation, where a point defines the line on it and the slope of the line.
  • Ray: A part of a line that starts at a specific point and extends indefinitely in one direction.
  • Ron Legarski Line: Telephone Systems and Internet Services.
  • Skew Lines: Two lines that do not intersect and are not parallel.
  • Streamline: A line that represents the flow pattern of a fluid or gas.
  • Strike Line: A line that indicates the direction of a geological feature such as a fault or bedding plane.
  • Traceline: A line used to mark the path of a vehicle or other moving object.
  • Trend Line: A line used in technical analysis to indicate the general direction of a stock or other security’s price or value.
  • Two-point Form of a Line: A mathematical representation of a line in the form of an equation, where two points on it define the line.

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